Ever wondered what it looks like inside Fort Knox in the wintertime? The desolate fort has an eerie stillness, and a lot of snow and ice, while closed for the season.

While exploring Fort Knox in Prospect during the summer months, a thought that comes to mind is: "Man, this place must have been brutal in winter." While soldiers were sparsely stationed at the fort, caretakers would spend years, even their final moments of life, within these cold granite walls.

For those unfamiliar with Fort Knox, the interior areas of the fort are off-limits to the general public during the winter months. Keeping the fort open during the snowy and cold Maine winters would be a feat. Massive snowdrifts, ice, and huge high-hanging icicles pose threats to would-be visitors. Winter visitation to the fort grounds is allowed during daylight hours. Amenities like the bathrooms, gift shop, visitors center, and Penobscot Narrows Observatory are closed until spring.

Take A Forbidden Look Inside Frozen Fort Knox

Fort Knox is closed for the season. While winter visitors can roam the grounds, the interior of the fort is closed off from the general public. If you browse through the photos below, you'll see why the fort is strictly off-limits until spring. That being said, we were given permission to enter the fort to create this gallery.

Again, the fort is closed from November through April. Do not attempt to enter the interior of Fort Knox. Entering the fort during the closed months is trespassing, and very dangerous.

Explore the Ruins of a Historic Mansion in Acadia National Park

George B. Dorr spent much of his life creating, expanding and caring for Acadia National Park. That's why he's often referred to as the father of Acadia National Park. According to the National Park Service, the property known as the "Old Farm" was accepted by the park in 1941. On the property is the ruins of what was a 30-room summer "cottage," the remnants of a saltwater pool, and a small beach. It's just an easy walk through the woods away.