Summer is supposed to be fun.

It seems the further we get into 2021, it's almost like 2020 was just a warm-up. Sure, some things have improved. Rock shows are back, movie theaters are back open, and for a minute, we even got to stop wearing masks! But as the year drags on, some things seem worse than better.

Now, people need to prove vax status to get into restaurants, people fight about stupid stuff more than ever on social media, and the overall feeling of our country is split in two. One wonders sometimes if things could get worse. Well, did anyone predict man-eating lounge chairs on their "Bats#!7-crazy Bingo" card?

Yeah.... you definitely read that right.

Earlier this week, according to WABI/CNN, Dollar General recalled almost 160,000 lounge chairs because of their seemingly bloodthirsty nature. It seems that the hinges on these loungers have caused everything from pinches, to full-on amputations! Yup, people have lost fingers to their lawn chairs.

Their True Living Sling Loungers were offered up between January and September 2019 for the low, low price of $20. They've received several reports of the hinges causing all these crazy injuries, so now Dollar General is recalling them. If somehow, you still have the receipt, the UPC number is 430001047344.

What if I have one of these actual chairs?

If you are unfortunate enough to have one of these monster chairs, Dollar General recommends you stop using it immediately, and cut the fabric to make it unusable so that no one gets hurt. You can also contact them directly for a full refund. You can either call 800-678-9258 from 6 a.m. to 1 a.m. CT Monday through Friday or at their website.

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