This is a topic I'm particularly passionate about.

That's because I enjoy not being in a ditch or dealing with insurance or the hassle of car repairs. Or, you know, not dying.

Driving in the winter in Maine is scary. I love the belly flop feeling of being somewhat out of control while on a roller coaster. While behind the wheel? Not so much.

Instead, he decided to flash his high beams at me. A move that is never effective but less so when they are so close behind me that I can't see their headlights.

Recently I was driving on Route 302 and I as well as everyone else was humming along fine. Until we weren't. I could almost pinpoint where the roads turned to ice. The 18-wheeler in front of me nearly losing control was a sure sign to the line of traffic to slow down.

A couple of days ago I was on my way to work and the pavement was black from melted snow from the big storm we just had. The temperatures were in the negatives. After a few brake checks I felt ok but I wasn't about to go over the speed limit.

It wasn't long after I got to a 40 mph zone where a car zoomed up behind me and eventually got so close I decided to slow down even further. I wanted this guy off my bumper and thought maybe he would just pass me. Instead, he decided to flash his high beams at me. A move that is never effective but less so when they are so close behind me that I can't see their headlights.

Does it make me a bad person to say I envisioned them passing me, hitting some black ice, and ending up lodged in a snowbank or ditch? Not hurt of course. But I did delight in how satisfying it would have been to slowly drive past with a friendly wave.

The point being, black ice is unpredictable and unforgiving. It doesn't matter your tires, or your vehicle, black ice can cause at best a scare and at worse a deadly car accident.

The Maine Department of Transportation released a video addressing a very important piece of this topic. Just because your car says it's above freezing on your dash, doesn't mean that's the temperature of the road.

With another storm on its way and cold temperatures lingering for a few more weeks, at least, pause and consider the risk before being reckless. It could save a life.

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