Canine Tagalongs

Maine has experienced multiple heatwaves already for 2021 with temperatures in the 90s and feeling in the triple digits.

Still, irresponsible pet owners think this can be perfectly fine for dogs if they have to run an errand or two. It's not.

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The Real Danger

Kennebec Valley Humane Society recently shared an incredibly important graphic from the ASPCA detailing just how dangerous leaving your pet in the car.

Leaving the window cracked? That's simply not good enough.

Parked in the shade too? Still, not good enough.

In fact, even if it's a relatively cool day at just 70 degrees the internal temperature of the vehicle can reach 90 degrees. An 85-degree day can reach into the triple digits in just 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, 120 degrees.

Just think how painful it is when you return from the grocery store and sit on leather seats or catch the seatbelt buckle. It's hot, isn't it?

Overheating

In the event of a pet overheating, if action isn't taken quickly the animal can suffer from heat exhaustion, heatstroke, or sudden death according to the American Kennel Club.

The AKC recommends pet owners keep an eye out for symptoms such as panting, disorientation, noisy breathing, bright red or blue gums, and more.

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What You CAN'T Do

If you're out and about and you see a dog inside of a presumably hot car, it can be incredibly jarring. It makes sense to feel the impulse to bust the little furball out. But here in Maine, that's illegal.

According to Maine law (Maine 7 MRSA § 4019), authorization to rescue an animal from a car is only explicitly given to specific individuals such as a law enforcement officer, animal control officer, and select others. Only those individuals are immune from criminal or civil liability.

A few years back, Bangor PD took on this issue head-on on their Facebook page in a delightfully cheeky way after a post had gone viral instructing people on how to break a window of a car to rescue an animal and not get in trouble. It just wasn't true. You can read it here.

What You CAN Do

The Humane Society of the United States recommends taking down the vehicle's information; make, model, plate number, and giving it to the nearby business in hopes of contacting the vehicle/pet owner before getting the police involved.

A well-intended civilian is simply bound by law to not break into a vehicle so police should be contacted (via a non-emergency line) in these situations. They will then either send someone for assistance or give you further direction.

Let's not put people in this difficult situation, shall we? If you're a pet parent leave the pup at home and safe!

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To prepare yourself for a potential incident, always keep your vet's phone number handy, along with an after-hours clinic you can call in an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a hotline you can call at (888) 426-4435 for advice.

Even with all of these resources, however, the best cure for food poisoning is preventing it in the first place. To give you an idea of what human foods can be dangerous, Stacker has put together a slideshow of 30 common foods to avoid. Take a look to see if there are any that surprise you.

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