When I was very little, there was a lot going on in my family. On top of that, my sister is a lot older than I am. So to be fair, Santa didn't play as big a role in my life as maybe he did for other kids. Likely to their detriment, because I was far too willing to share my particular views on Santa.

Then in grade school, I became the ruiner. I let everyone know that would even listen that Santa Claus was a made-up TV character basically. As Lucy said in the Charlie Brown Christmas special..."it's all just run by some big Eastern syndicate you know...". Needless to say, I was not a popular child. I think I even made one kid cry.

As I got older, I began to realize maybe Santa was real. After all, who's constantly performing all the Christmas miracles that happen every year. Even this year. Think about it... you finally have that excuse you've always wanted to not have to go over to Aunt Ethel's house and kiss her hairy cheek again. If that's not a Christmas miracle, I don't know what is.

Now, if you've got kids, getting their letters to Santa may be a lot tougher this year with all the trouble the Postal Service is having trying to keep with all the extra packages of joy floating around our country right now, so to help out, Fairmount Market, on Hammond Street in Bangor, is helping out Santa and the USPS.

Dan Tremble, the owner of Fairmount Market said this to Fox ABC Maine:

This year we decided we had to do it because it’s been a difficult year for everyone especially kids who can’t go see Santa Claus.

They've set up a special direct mailbox, so that letters can make it directly to Santa. No child should ever have to worry about whether or not their letter makes it up to the Big Guy in the North Pole.

You can rest easy kids(and parents), because now there's a direct line of communication. Make your list, and check it twice, and head over to Fairmount Market to send Santa what he needs. That way everyone can have as merry a Christmas as possible.

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